Saint Nicholas Speculaas Tart

 

Saint Nicholas Speculaas Tart | Koekbook

 

 

 

It’s that time of year again to eat too many pepernoten, inhale speculaas cookies and gain a pound in chocolate: yup, Sinterklaas is in the country! I’ve been seeing the most delicious Sinterklaas bakes by fellow bloggers on Instagram (I swear I spend too much time on Instagram these days, I’m addicted..), amongst which a speculaas cream tart topped with traditional Sinterklaas treats (“strooigoed”) by Rutger Bakt, the first winner of Dutch Bake Off. I was thoroughly inspired and decided to bake my own version!

Saint Nicholas Speculaas Tart | Koekbook

Speculaas spices, which are used in the pastry cream, are most delicious, a bit similar to pumpkin spice or mixed spice but slightly different. You can make your own blend, for example following this recipe. There are many variations to be found though, so find out which one suits your taste best! I find speculaas goes really well with chocolate, so I used cocoa powder in my pastry dough, but you can also use a vanilla version of the dough if preferred.

Saint Nicholas Speculaas Tart | Koekbook

Strewn on top of this tart are traditional Sinterklaas treats, also known as “strooigoed” (throwing treats). Throwing, because Sinterklaas’s helpers, his “Petes”, are known to throw them at children when visiting schools or community centers. Yup, kids eat it off floors! I suppose it’s good for their immune systems, but I’m sure Americans would freak out over it. Don’t worry, no one ever died from eating a pepernoot off the floor ūüėČ You can bake your own pepernoten and cover them in chocolate, or buy sweets online or even at a specialty Dutch store. When you don’t feel like doing all that, the tart is delicious without the “strooigoed” as well and will give you sufficient cozy¬†Saint Nicholas Eve feels. Best served with a steaming mug of hot chocolate!

Saint Nicholas Speculaas Tart | Koekbook

 

Recipe Saint Nicholas Speculaas Tart

Tools: 35×11 cm tart tin (or tin with equivalent dimensions – you might have to do a bit of math!), baking beans, baking parchment, rolling pin, pastry brush, piping bag

Ingredients

P√Ęte Sucr√©e au Chocolat (Pastry Dough):

90 grams icing sugar
25 grams unsweetened cocoa powder
120 grams soft unsalted butter
2 grams salt
30 grams almond flour
1 egg
210 grams plain or pastry flour

75 grams white chocolate, chopped

Speculaas Pastry Cream:

400 ml full-fat milk
1 tablespoon vanilla extract or 1/2 seeds of a vanilla pod
4 egg yolks
100 grams castor sugar
40 grams flour
2 teaspoons speculaas spices

Topping:

Sinterklaas treats/candy to taste

1. To make the pastry dough, sift icing sugar and cocoa powder into a large bowl. Add butter, salt and almond flour and mix until well combined on low speed. Add egg, mix until incorporated. Add flour and knead or mix until just incorporated. Wrap dough in clingfilm and leave to chill for at least 1 hour.

2. In the meanwhile, make the pastry cream. Pour 375ml of the milk and the vanilla extract or seeds in a saucepan. In a bowl, combine the rest of the ingredients. Bring milk to a boil, pour into the other ingredients while continuously whisking. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and bring to a boil while whisking. Leave to cook for about 1 minute, then take off the heat and cover the top of the cream with clingfilm. Leave to cool.

3. Preheat the oven to 180C/355F.

4. Grease the tart tin. Roll the chilled dough out into a rectangle large than the tin. You’ll have a bit of leftover pastry which you can use to make chocolate cookies or to make some smaller tarts, so don’t roll the pastry too thick. Cut the overhanging pastry away. Chill the pastry base for at least 30 minutes. Prick the bottom of the case all over with a fork. Line the base with baking parchment and fill with baking beans. Bake for 20 minutes, then take the baking beans and parchment out and bake for another 20-25 minutes. Leave to cool.

5. Melt 75 grams white chocolate au bain marie. Use a pastry brush to brush the whole pastry shell with white chocolate. This will keep the shell from going soggy. Leave to set (you can do this in the fridge.

6. Fill a piping bag with large round nozzle with the pastry cream. Stir the pastry cream first if it has gone very firm). Pipe the cream into the pastry shell. Top with Sinterklaas treats and candy. Best served on the same day. Enjoy!

Lemon Meringue Tart

Lemon Meringue Tart | Koekbook

A couple of weeks ago I had the chance to go crazy with the baking again and make two awesome tarts/pies as I was having another birthday party! Both were/are showstopping and absolutely delicious. The first of the two is this amazing lemon meringue tart – no, not a pie because I feel this is a French recipe!

I’m always excited to make lemon-flavored bakes – I love the tartness of lemons and always have. As a kid I would always go for the sourest candies (to be honest I still do). It can never be too sour for me (think blisteringly sour). Don’t worry though, this tart isn’t extremely sour, the tartness is balanced nicely by a good amount of sugar and meringue on top!

If you don’t have a blowtorch, you could put the tart under the grill for a minute to get that nice caramelization on top, but I like the control you get with a torch. Those meringue tips remind me of roasting marshmallows over a campfire, mm….

Lemon Meringue Tart Recipe

Tools: 23cm tart tin (preferably loose bottomed), baking beans, a sugar thermometer

Ingredients:

Sweet Shortcrust Pastry (Mary Berry):

250 grams plain or pastry flour
150 grams unsalted butter, cold, diced
25 grams icing sugar
1 egg

Lemon Filling (Cuisine avec Djouza):

80 grams (fresh) lemon juice
zest of 2 lemons
125 grams unsalted butter
125 grams caster sugar
200 grams egg (whole)
10 grams cornstarch

Meringue Topping (Cuisine avec Djouza):

100 grams egg white
200 grams caster sugar
70 grams water

  1. To make the pastry, combine flour and sugar. Add the diced butter. If you’re using a food processor with blade attachment, whizz until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. You can also use your hands or a fork to rub the butter into the flour mixture – again, it should look like breadcrumbs. Then add the egg and mix or knead until the dough starts to come together. Work the dough as little as possible. Shape dough into a disc and wrap in clingfilm. Chill for at least an hour.
  2. Preheat the oven to 200C.
  3. Roll the dough out on a lightly floured work surface to the thickness of a pound coin. Line the tart tin with the dough and transfer to the fridge to chill for 30 minutes. Once chilled, line the pastry case with non-stick baking paper and fill with baking beans or uncooked rice. Bake blind for 15 minutes, then remove the beans and paper and bake another 10 to 15 minutes until it is a golden brown. Remove from the oven but leave the tart shell in the tin.
  4. To make the lemon filling, combine lemon juice, zest, and butter in a saucepan. In a bowl, combine sugar, egg and cornstarch. Melt butter with lemon juice and zest and bring to a boil. Turn heat off, whisk lemon juice mixture into the egg mixture. Pour it back into the saucepan and bring to a boil. Once the mixture has thickened, turn the heat off and leave to cool for a bit.
  5. Fill the cooled tart shell with the lemon filling. Place in the fridge to set.
  6. Once the tart is cold enough, make the meringue topping. Pour egg whites (preferably at room temperature or a little warmer) into a greaseless bowl (make sure your whisk is greaseless as well! you can achieve this by cleaning you utensils/bowls with lemon juice or vinegar).
  7. In a saucepan, combine sugar and water and place a sugar thermometer in the pan. Once the mixture reaches 114C, start whisking the egg whites. Once the mixture has reached 120C, pour it slowly into the egg whites while you’re whisking them. Whisk until the meringue has cooled down.
  8. Fill a piping bag with a nozzle to your liking with the meringue and pipe onto the tart. Alternatively, if you don’t have a piping bag, you could use a (palette) knife to make peaks of meringue. Use a blowtorch to caramelize the meringue on top. Enjoy!

Asparagus and Egg Tart

Asparagus and Egg Tart | Koekbook

It seems the first asparagus was consumed in Egypt, but make no mistake, it is a staple Dutch food as well. The province of Limburg is where most of our asparagus come from, in green or white versions.Asparagus and Egg Tart | Koekbook

Asparagus is harvested in a special way, which is called ‚Äúasperge steken‚ÄĚ in Dutch. They are pulled out of the ground by hand! In this tart, I pair them with eggs, but you could also add ham for a classic combination.

 

Asparagus and Egg Tart Recipe

Serves 8

450 grams green asparagus
¬Ĺ cup cr√®me fra√ģche
4 large eggs
1 cup grated Dutch mature cheese
¬ľ cup chopped chives
salt and pepper to taste
250 grams puff pastry

  1. Preheat the oven to 390F.
  2. Half the asparagus. Bring plenty of water to a boil in a large pan, add asparagus and cook for 3 minutes or until soft, but not mushy. Drain, then set aside.
  3. In a bowl, mix together the cr√®me fra√ģche, 2 large eggs, cheese, chives, salt and pepper.
  4. Line a baking tray with baking parchment. Roll the puff pastry out to about 16×7 inches. Fold about 1 inch over on each side, make sure to pinch the seams well.
  5. Spread the cr√®me fra√ģche mixture onto the pastry. Distribute the asparagus over the tart. Place in the oven, bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the pastry is a nice golden brown. The tart can be eaten both warm and cold!

 

 

Apple and Blackberry Tart

Apple and Blackberry Tart | Koekbook

I have a super fun yearly trip to my friend Nadine and her family, and this week I spent a lovely 4 days at their house again, the occasion being a cake competition. Even though I had a rough time with some neck muscles (argh!) I managed to place second with my “Pearamid” cake, with pears, aniseed, chai spices – well all sorts of good stuff basically. I will place the recipe on my blog sometime later this year! Right now, though, I want to share this utterly delicious blackberry and apple tart with y’all!

 

It so happened that a Dutch supermarket had launched a competition for the best apple cake/pie/tart (it’s the same word in Dutch for all of them: taart) baked by a duo. Of course, Nadine and I could not resist participating, we are some of the most competitive people/bakers in the Netherlands I think…

After a bit of brainstorming, Nadine mentioned blackberries were ripening in her area so naturally, we couldn’t resist using those in our tart! She went out in the early (well…early for me) hours of the morning to pick a good amount of them and we set off to create this delicious bake.

It is a bit of a play on a Bakewell Tart, but with different nuts and jam and of course apple on top. Okay, it’s not really a Bakewell… But it’s still delicious. The best thing about this (I think) is marinating the apples in blackberry juice with just a touch of cinnamon, I couldn’t stop eating those darn slices (we had some left).

But of course, the arrangement of the apples makes this tart a real showstopper! If you’re unsure on how to do this, check Youtube for some how-to clips (rose apple tart), it’s very easy but a bit time intensive (so worth it though!). Oh, and it’s me in the picture below! Do notice the lovely bracelet Nadine’s sister made me – it’s awesome!

 

Apple and Blackberry Tart Recipe

For one tart, 28cm in diameter

Ingredients:

Dough (Mary Berry Recipe)
225 grams plain flour
pinch of salt
25 grams icing sugar
150 grams cold unsalted butter, cubed
1 egg, beaten
1 tablespoon ice cold water

Frangipane
150 grams sugar
150 grams softened unsalted butter
1 egg
75 grams ground pecans
75 grams ground walnuts
2 tablespoons flour

200 grams (homemade) blackberry jam

Apple Topping
4 Pink Lady Apples
400 ml blackberry juice
45 ml lemon juice
55 ml water
150 grams sugar
1 roasted cinnamon stick

  1. To make the dough, firstly combine the flour, salt, and sugar. Put it into the bowl of a food processor fitted with a blade attachment, then add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles bread crumbs. Add the egg and pulse until combined. If the dough hasn’t started to come together yet, add the ice cold water and pulse until the dough has come together. Shape the dough into a disc, wrap in clingfilm and chill for at least 30 minutes. Butter the tart pan and set aside.
  2. To make the frangipane, beat the sugar and butter together until fluffy. Add the egg a little at a time and beat until combined. Add the nuts and flour and stir until combined. Spoon into a piping bag, set aside.
  3. Prepare the apples by cutting them into thin slices (in the food processor if preferred). Pour the blackberry juice, lemon juice and water in a pan and add the sugar and the cinnamon stick. Heat until the sugar has dissolved. Then add the apple slices and leave them to marinate.
  4. Roll the dough out to a circle large enough for the tart tin and line the tin with it. Leave any overhanging pastry. Chill again for 30 minutes. In the meanwhile, preheat the oven to 175C/340F. Once chilled, line the tart with baking parchment and fill with baking beans. Bake for 15 minutes, then remove the beans and parchment and prick holes in the base with a fork. Bake another 5 minutes. Fill the tart with the blackberry jam, then pipe the frangipane on top (use the back of a spoon to smoothen it out). Bake for another15 minutes, then arrange the apple slices on top of the tart to resemble a rose. Start with laying the slices flat on the outer ring, then simply work your way to the middle. Bake another 15 minutes. Leave the tart to cool on a wire rack. Enjoy!

Dutch Strawberry Tarts

Dutch Strawberry Tarts | Koekbook

A second recipe in one week! Well, that can only mean that I feel really good ūüėČ I recently switched thesis supervisor and it’s done me a lot of good – I’m actually writing again and the end of my degree is finally in sight! The weather has also been great lately which has done something to lift my spirits somehow – I was never a weather sensitive person but this year the cold has bothered me more than usual. With sun also comes fresh, juicy strawberries to make lovely bakes with so it’s a win-win!Dutch Strawberry Tarts | Koekbook

Dutch Strawberry Tarts | Koekbook

 

These tarts are made with what is called “sloffendeeg” in Dutch. It’s a dough made for tarts (or “koeken” as we call them) like “kano’s“, “sloffen” ¬†and “rondo’s” and it’s filled with almond paste. They are a staple item in Dutch bakeries! The dough results in¬†bakes that are crunchy on the outside and softer on the inside, which I think is absolutely perfect. You can top it with all sorts of things, a “rondo” can be topped with only a blanched almond but you can use creme pat, swiss cream, whipped cream or anything you fancy (I’ve even seen apple pie filling on these!). ¬†For this tart I have paired creme pat with some plump strawberries.

Dutch Strawberry Tarts | Koekbook

 

 

 

Recipe Dutch Strawberry Tarts (Rondo’s)

For 5 tarts

Tools: 5 pastry rings 8 cm in diameter, 2,5cm in height (or higher)

Ingredients:

Dough:

125 grams pastry flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
90 grams unsalted butter, softened
90 grams caster sugar
1/4 teaspoon lemon zest
1/2 egg yolk

Almond paste:

75 grams ground almonds
75 grams caster sugar
1 egg
a drop of almond extract

Topping:

3 egg yolks
70 grams caster sugar
25 grams flour
8 grams cornstarch
250 ml full-fat milk
1/2 vanilla pod (seeds of)
13 grams unsalted butter
250 grams strawberries, sliced
  1. For the dough, put the flour, baking powder, butter, sugar, egg yolk, zest and salt in a bowl and knead into a dough. Wrap in clingfilm and chill for at least 60 mins.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180C/355F. Grease the pastry rings. Roll the dough out to 7-8mm thickness. Cut out the tart shapes with the baking rings. Place pastry rounds on baking sheet and place baking rings around it.
  3. Make the almond paste by first mixing the sugar and almond flour, and then adding the almond extract and as much egg as is needed to make a slack mixture. Spread or pipe almond paste on the pastry rings, leaving a 1 cm border. Bake for about 20 mins. Once baked, immediately remove baking rings (be careful!) and leave to cool.
  4. For the creme pat, mix the egg yolks, half of the sugar, the flour and the cornstarch in a bowl. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, mix the milk, vanilla seeds and the other half of the sugar. Bring milk mixture to a boil, remove from the fire and add half of it to the egg yolk mixture while continuously stirring. Pour this back into the milk and heat while continuously stirring. Boil for 2 minutes.
  5. Leave cream to cool for 10 minutes. Then mix in the butter. Leave to cool completely with cling film over the surface of the cream.
  6. Once everything has cooled, pipe pastry cream onto each tart and place strawberries on top. Enjoy!

Pear Frangipane Tart

I am writing this while an autumn storm is raging outside. I have to say, I like autumn a lot more than I do summer – no sticky clothes, sore thighs from wearing shorts that are just a little too short and those pesky insects. Just crisp autumn air, gorgeous natural colors and knitted jumpers. And: A LOT OF BAKING.

With loads of tasty autumn fruits around it’s difficult resisting the urge to bake every day. For this tart, I used fresh, ripe, juicy pears paired with a lovely frangipane. So good with a steaming cup of tea!

If you want, you can add a little cinnamon to the frangipane. My mother hates cinnamon (I know, it’s a travesty!) so I didn’t add any myself, but I can imagine the urge to add some. I always applaud creativity! ūüôā

 

Pear Frangipane Tart Recipe

Source: P√Ęte Sucr√©e and Frangipane recipes from Paul Hollywood’s “How to Bake

Tools: 23cm (loose bottomed) tart tin

Ingredients:

P√Ęte Sucr√©e:

165 grams pastry flour
25 grams ground almonds
120 grams cold butter, diced
55 grams caster sugar
1 egg

Frangipane + Filling:

100 grams softened butter
45 grams caster sugar
2 large eggs
75 grams plain flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
100 grams ground almonds
1 teaspoon almond extract
8 small ripe pears
25 grams almond shavings
  1. To prepare the pastry: combine flours and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with blade attachment. Add butter, blitz until you have a crumbly mixture. Add egg and blitz until the dough starts to come together. Shape dough into a ball, wrap in clingfilm. Leave to chill for at least an hour.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 180C/355F.
  3. For the frangipane, cream the butter and sugar for abut 3 minutes. Add the eggs and a tablespoon of the flour and mix for another 2 minutes. Add the rest of the flour, baking powder, ground almonds and almond extract and mix another 2 minutes. Set aside.
  4. Grease and flour the tart tin. Roll the pastry out to a large enough circle to fit the tin (not too thick). Pipe or spread the frangipane into the pastry case. Peel pears, halve them and remove the center. Push the pear halves into the frangipane. Sprinkle with the almond shavings.
  5. Bake for about 40 minutes or until the tart is a nice golden brown. Remove from tart tin and slide onto a wire rack to cool down. Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. Enjoy!

Greengage (Reine Claude) and Pistachio Tart

Greengage (Reine Claude) and Pistachio Tart | Koekbook

I’ve only ever known Reine Claude plums from those eerily green lemonade syrups – which are delicious but are probably not too good for you. I’d never encountered these green beauties in the “flesh” until this week, when I saw them on offer in my local supermarket. I couldn’t help myself and grabbed a box to go in a bake!

Apparently, Reine Claudes are named after ¬†Queen Claude, duchess of Brittany, who lived a short life at the beginning of the 16th century. She was wife of King Francis I of France. In French they’re also called “la bonne reine” – the good queen. Well, they taste good, that’s for sure!

Greengage (Reine Claude) and Pistachio Tart | Koekbook

I have paired these little queens with pistacho paste and a creamy cr√®me patissi√®re to go in a short crust (p√Ęte sabl√©e), flavored with lemon. I would say this tart is fit for a queen, wouldn’t you?

Recipe Reine Claude and Pistachio Tart

Tools: 24cm tart tin, baking brush, piping bag (optional)

Ingredients:

Dough

1/2 quantity p√Ęte sabl√©e with lemon flavor (use zest of 3/4 lemon for 1 whole quantity dough)

Pistachio-Almond Paste

30 grams ground pistachios
30 grams almond flour
60 grams caster sugar
egg white

Crème Patissière

3 egg yolks
70 grams caster sugar
25 grams flour
8 grams cornstarch
250 ml full-fat milk
1/2 vanilla pod (seeds of)
13 grams unsalted butter

Topping

400 grams greengages
10 grams pistachios, some chopped
25 grams apricot jam, heated

Instructions:

Tart Shell

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C.
  2. Grease and flour the tart tin. Roll out the dough to a circle large enough to fit the tin. Place in tin, cut away the edges. Freeze for about 30 minutes. Prick the bottom of the shell all over with a fork.
  3. Bake shell blind for 20 minutes, then remove the baking beans and bak for another 6 minutes. Leave to cool in the tin.

Pistachio Paste

  1. Mix together the almond flour, chopped pistachios and sugar in a bowl.
  2. Add enough egg white to make a paste.

Crème Patissière

  1. Mix the egg yolks, half of the sugar, the flour and the cornstarch in a bowl. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, mix the milk, vanilla seeds and the other half of the sugar. Bring milk mixture to a boil, remove from the fire and add half of it to the egg yolk mixture while continuously stirring. Pour this back into the milk and heat while continuously stirring. Boil for 2 minutes.
  2. Leave cream to cool for 10 minutes. Then mix in the butter. Leave to cool completely with cling film over the surface of the cream.

Assembly

  1. Spread the pistachio paste over the bottom of the tart shell.
  2. Pipe or spread the cooled crème patissière over the pistachio paste in an even layer.
  3. Slice the greengages and place them in the tart shell.
  4. With a pastry brush, brush apricot jam over the greengages. Sprinkle over pistachios. Best served on the day.

Marie Antoinoisette (Raspberry, Rose and Lychee Tart)

 

Marie Antoinoisette (Raspberry, Rose and Lychee Tart) | KoekbookIn high school I had a fantastic history teacher. He was able to tell about important (and less important) historical events with unmatched creativity. One of the stories that has always stuck with me is the one he told us about Marie Antoinette. As Queen of France, Marie Antoinette had her own little village near Versailles, the Petit Trianon. Marie like to pretend she was a farmer or shepherd and the whole village was populated with “villagers” who acted along with her.Marie Antoinoisette (Raspberry, Rose and Lychee Tart) | KoekbookFrench people at the time had poor hygiene which they tried, with varying levels of success, to hide. Even Marie’s lil’ sheep had to smell nice – they wouldn’t want her being offended by their natural scent..¬†So before Marie came for a visit in her farmer’s outfit (which was made of the finest silks), her sheep had to be washed and perfumed.

I have based this tart on that story. No panic, I have nothing to gloss over, there are no sheep in this tart. The rose cream in this tart only hides a deliciously short crust. I have tried to weave the refined, exquisite nature of Marie Antoinette into the flavors. Marie also had a catty side to her, so for some texture I’ve added caramelized almonds.

Marie Antoinoisette Recipe

Ingredients:

Dough

1/2 portion p√Ęte sabl√©e

White Chocolate Ganache

60 grams white chocolate
2 teaspoons whipping cream

 

Lychee Crème Patissière

James Morton recipe

3 egg yolks
70 grams caster sugar
25 grams flour
8 grams cornstarch
250 ml full-fat milk
13 grams unsalted butter
1/2 can (450gr) lychees, drained and chopped finely

 

Rose-Raspberry Cream

100 grams mascarpone
200 ml whipping cream
3 tablespoons icing sugar
1/2 teaspoon rose water
200 grams frozen raspberries (thawed and drained)


Caramelized Almonds

50 grams water
100 grams sugar
10 grams unsalted butter
50 grams almond shavings

 

Topping

raspberries

chopped up lychees

Instructions:

Tart Shell

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C.
  2. Grease and flour the tart tin. Roll out the dough to a circle large enough to fit the tin. Place in tin, cut away the edges. Freeze for about 30 minutes. Prick the bottom of the shell all over with a fork.
  3. Bake shell blind for 20 minutes, then remove the baking beans and bak for another 6 minutes. Leave to cool in the tin.

Lychee Crème Patissière

  1. Mix the egg yolks, half of the sugar, the flour and the cornstarch in a bowl. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, mix the milk and the other half of the sugar. Bring milk mixture to a boil, remove from the fire and add half of it to the egg yolk mixture while continuously stirring. Pour this back into the milk and heat while continuously stirring. Boil for 2 minutes.
  2. Leave cream to cool for 10 minutes. Then mix in the butter and chopped lychees. Leave to cool completely with cling film over the surface of the cream.

Rose Raspberry Cream

  1. Whisk whipping cream, mascarpone, icing sugar and rose water until you have a stiff consistency.
  2. If you have any large chunks of raspberry, make them smaller with a fork. Spoon raspberries through the cream and set aside in the fridge to stiffen up.

Caramelized Almonds

  1. Heat sugar and water in a sauce pan until the mixture has a golden-brown color.
  2. While you’re doing this, roast the almond shavings in a non-stick pan. Add the butter, stir it around and leave in the pan (the mixture should remain warm). Pour in the caramel and stir it around.
  3. Pour the mixture onto baking parchment and flatten. Once cooled, slice into “cookies”

Assembly

  1. Melt the white chocolate with the whipping cream au bain marie. Use it to cover the inside of the tart.
  2. Fit 2 piping bags with a large round nozzle and fill them with the creme pat and raspberry cream. Use them to spiral the creams into the tart shell + make some rosettes with the raspberry cream.
  3. Add the topping. Enjoy!

Blueberry Frangipane Tart

 

Blueberry Frangipane Tart | Koekbook

It’s finally summery here in the Netherlands! Yesterday was the first day of the year I went outside without a coat and didn’t freeze to death. It’s about 24C and we have a lovely breeze – perfect weather in my opinion, as long as I don’t have to sit directly in the sun (I’m so white people mistake me for a milk bottle). But with summery weather comes cheap(er) berries! Blueberries were on sale this week so I thought I might bake some stuff with those lil juicy buggers.

 

Blueberry Frangipane Tart | Koekbook

 

You might notice the interesting shape of this tart. It’s a shape we have here in the Netherlands called a “slof” – ¬†a slipper. Of course you can bake these in a round baking ring if you don’t have this shape. I think it’ll be about 18-20 cm in diameter baked in a round ring.

Blueberry Frangipane Tart | Koekbook

The pastry of this tart is really lovely and short, it’s a “p√Ęte breton”, filled with frangipane it’s absolutely perfect. I added a bit of cardamom to the dough but you could go for lemon zest as well. Topped off with pastry cream, fresh blueberries and whipped cream it’s gorgeous.

Blueberry Frangipane Tart | Koekbook

Blueberries always make me think of Veruca Salt from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (book and the ORIGINAL movie, come on people ;)). Is it weird that I thought Veruca looked quite tasty as a blueberry? And that I wanted to drink all the blueberry juice that had to have come out of her? I love Roald Dahl’s books so much, together with J.K. Rowling he shaped my childhood.

Blueberry Frangipane Tart | Koekbook

Serve this tart on the day wíth the pastry cream, alternatively the base could keep for a few days without the pastry cream. Enjoy! <3

Blueberry Frangipane Tart | Koekbook

Blueberry Frangipane Tart Recipe

Source: Rutger Bakt

Tools: baking ring (round or “slipper” shape), baking sheet lined with baking parchment, pastry brush

Ingredients:

Base:

125 grams pastry flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
90 grams unsalted butter, softened
50 grams caster sugar
40 grams brown sugar
1/2 egg yolk
1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon salt
30 grams ground almonds
30 grams caster sugar
1 egg
1/8 teaspoon natural almond extract

Topping:

1/2 vanilla pod (seeds)
250 ml full-fat milk
50 grams caster sugar
1 egg yolk
20 grams cornstarch
150 grams blueberries
1 tablespoon apricot jam, heated and sieved
100 grams whipping cream
1 1/2 teaspoon caster sugar
  1. For the dough, put the flour, baking powder, butter, sugars, egg yolk, cardamom and salt in a bowl and knead into a dough. Wrap in clingfilm and chill for at least 60 mins.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180C/355F. Grease the baking ring. Roll the dough out to 7-8mm thickness. Cut out the tart shape with the baking ring. Place pastry on baking sheet and place baking ring around it. Make the frangipane by first mixing the sugar and almond flour, and then adding the almond extract and as much egg as is needed to make a slack mixture. Spread frangipane on the pastry, leaving a 1,5 cm border. Bake for 23-28 mins. Once baked, immediately remove baking ring and leave to cool.
  3. To make the pastry cream, mix vanilla seeds and milk in a saucepan. Mix the egg yolk, sugar, cornstarch and 2 tablespoons of the vanilla milk in a bowl. Bring vanilla milk to a boil, take off the heat and pour into the egg mixture while whisking. Pour back into the saucepan and bring back to a boil while stirring continuously until the mixture starts to thicken. Set aside to cool slightly.
  4. Once the pastry base has cooled, assemble the tart. Pipe the pastry cream on top, the place the blueberries on top of that. Brush blueberries with the heated apricot jam. Whisk whipped cream with sugar and pipe onto the blueberries. Enjoy!

Tarte aux Mirabelles (Mirabelle Tart)

Tarte aux Mirabelles (Mirabelle Tart) | A Dutchie Baking

 

Last year I visited Paris and that trip is still inspiring me today. Patisseries were stocked with mirabelle goods, tartes fines and “regular” tarts. I had never heard of mirabelles, and it turned out they were utterly delicious! They are a type of plum that grows abundantly in France and Germany. The color is greenish and the flavor and texture are very soft. A perfect tart to serve at my birthday party!

Tarte aux Mirabelles (Mirabelle Tart) | A Dutchie Baking

My birthday is tomorrow (the 29th) but I already celebrated on Saturday. I baked a delicious nut gateau as well as this simpler tarte. Both were big hits! I love French baking culture so I try to incorporate it into my routine as much as I can. It is so delicate <3. The recipe is adapted from an 80s baking book by the Roux brothers, the one I picked up for a pound! What French baking staples do you love? Had you ever heard of mirabelles before? Let me know!

Tarte aux Mirabelles (Mirabelle Tart) | A Dutchie Baking

 

Tarte aux Mirabelles Recipe

Adapted from “The Roux Brothers on Patisserie” by Albert and Michel Roux

Tools: tart tin or ring (24 cm in diameter, 2 1/2 cm high), pastry brush

Ingredients:

Shortcrust pastry:

250 gr plain flour
160 gr unsalted butter, cold, diced
1 egg
pinch of sugar
5 gr salt
1 tbsp cold milk

Filling:

2 egg yolks
40 gr sugar
13 gr flour
165 ml full-fat milk
1/2 vanilla pod, split
800 gr pitted mirabelles, (canned/potted) drained or fresh poached in syrup and drained
50 gr apricot jam
  1. To make the pastry: in a food processor with a blade attachment, blitz together the flour and sugar. Add the cold butter and pulse until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Mix the egg and milk together in a separate bowl, then pour into the processor bowl. Pulse until the mixture starts to come together. Wrap in clingfilm and leave to chill for at least 2 hours.
  2. To make the filling: whip the egg yolks with 1/3 of the sugar until light and fluffy. Fold the flour into the egg mixture. In a saucepan, combine the milk with the rest of the sugar and the seeds of the vanilla pod. Bring milk mixture to a boil, then take off of the heat and pour some into the egg mixture while whisking. Put pan back onto the heat and pour egg mixture into the milk while whisking. Bring to a boil, simmer for 3 minutes. Pour into a bowl and cover with clingfilm. Leave to cool.
  3. Preheat the oven to 220C.
  4. Grease the tart tin/ring. Roll the pastry out to about 3 mm thick. Line the tin/ring, cut off the excess pastry. Spread the filling evenly over the pastry base and arrange the whole pitted mirabelles on top. Bake for about 40 minutes.
  5. Once baked, leave tart in the tin/ring until cooled somewhat and firm enough to turn out. Then turn out onto a wire rack. Heat apricot jam and sieve. Brush the top of the tart with the jam. Serve tart when it has cooled, do not put in the refridgerator!